A Confessed Scarfoholic

scarfSince learning how to knit at the age of ten, it is unnecessary to say that I have accumulated somewhat of a hillock of knitting projects. There have been tons of sweaters knitted just for the store alone. And, don’t get me wrong. I do enjoy putting on that finished sweater and prancing around the house, singing “I made this! I am a genius!” (Let’s face it. There is nothing like self praise). I have gone the gamut from socks, baby sweaters, afghans, and gloves. I have nurtured a healthy addiction to all aspects of felting, from dry needle to knitted felting. But, far and above everything else, I LOVE making scarves. Why, you may ask? Okay. I will tell you.

There are limitless types of scarves. It is an ideal first project. It can be a very basic design, but made out of a luxury fiber, it can be spectacular. When I am teaching someone to knit, we start with a simple scarf. But, it is my belief that using a quality yarn and great needles makes knitting easier to learn, and ends with a much nicer scarf. I start out with either Spud and Chloe Sweater, or Malabrigo Worsted and a pair of Lantern Moon Featherlights (My new favorites). The process of knitting with these great materials is aesthetically pleasing, especially for a new knitter. Who needs a sharp, well made needle more than a new knitter? Also, the end result inspires the new knitter to continue knitting. Extra bonus here: it always fits!

Let’s go to the other side of the spectrum. The experienced knitter. Here again, a scarf project offers an exciting and rewarding knitting experience. It also allows the knitter to create his or her own designs. I have created several scarves, and love all of them. The potential is endless.

From Habu to Jade Sapphire Mongolian Cashmere, a scarf can be a work of art. It can be as unique as the knitter. So, in honor of the scarf, I am dedicating my blog to the making of the scarf for a while. In each blog, I will feature a scarf that, either I have made, or someone else has made that I feel is remarkable and want to share. I just finished a new one, made out of ShiBui Yarns, that, up to this time, I would have to say is my all time favorite. I loved making it, and I love the way it turned out.

The Four By Four Scarf is made with ShiBui yarns doubled and/or run together in a series of color changes. It is a luxurious 92″, and is amazingly soft with a great drape. When people see and touch it, they immediately want to make it. So, I am putting the knitting pattern for it in my blog:

The Four-By-Four Scarf

Diane Greenfield

This scarf is knitted in the twisted stockinette stitch, combining two and/or three yarns held together.

Finished length: 92″

Materials:

  • 4,6 skeins of ShiBui Cima, color Field (A)
  • 1 skein ShiBui Silk Cloud, color Field (B)
  • 4,6 skeins ShiBui Pebble, color Ivory (E)
  • 1 skein ShiBui Silk Cloud, color Flaxen (F)
  • 4,6 skeins ShiBui Pebble, color Sidewalk (C)
  • 1 skein ShiBui Silk Cloud, color Caffeine (D)
  • Size 5 needles ( I am recommending straights because, when working with Silk Cloud, a circular can be challenging. I recommend a sharp, wooden needle. My preference is Lantern Moon.)
  • Chibi darning needle

Gauge: 22 stitches to four inches

Twisted Stockinette Stitch: This stitch is similar to the Stockinette Stitch. The difference being that the knit stitch is knitted into the back loop. The purl stitch is the same traditional purl stitch.

This scarf is knitted in increments of four to eight inch squares, with various yarns held together. The entire scarf is knitted in the Twisted Stockinette Stitch.

Cast on 80 stitches

Block 1: With two of A held together, knit 8 inches.

Block 2: With two of A and one B held together, knit 4 inches

Block 3: With one B and two of C held together, knit 4 inches

Block 4: With two of C held together, knit 8 inches

Block 5: With two of C and one D held together, knit 4 inches

Block 6: With two of D held together, knit 8 inches

Block 7: With yarns E and D held together, knit 4 inches

Block 8: With two of E held together, knit 8 inches

Block 9: With two E and one F held together, knit 4 inches

Block 10: With two A and F held together, knit 4 inches

Block 11: With two of A held together, knit 8 inches

Block 12: With two A and one B held together, knit 4 inches

Block 13: With two C and one B together, knit 4 inches

Block 14: With two of C held together, knit 8 inches

Block 15: With two C and one D held together, knit 4 inches

Block 16: With two of yarn E held together, knit 8 inches

Cast off loosely.

A Tip: I have learned from running yarns together that hand winding the yarns in balls works much better than cakes from a winder and swift. Because of gauge differences, the cakes will unroll at different rates. The balls unroll at similar rates and allows the yarns to sit smoothly together as you knit, instead of one looping on the other. It might be a bit more work to hand wind them all, but you will have an easier time knitting with them

Finishing: I am a major fan of blocking. However, in the case of this scarf, I found that using a steam iron directly on the scarf gave it the look I preferred. It softened and flattened it into more of a fabric. If you prefer to block it, that will work as well.

This scarf has already been made using a different color combination of ShiBui yarns. Feel free to browse our website to either imitate my design, or create one of your own. The beauty of the ShiBui color range is that you really can’t make a mistake putting colors together. They all work. So have fun and make one of these scarves. Hope you love it as much as I do.