Tag Archives: shibui yarn

Step Out Of The Box!

At the store, I hear the same thing a lot of the time. “I am a new knitter. I only know how to make simple things like scarves.” On more than one occasion, I have been told that only socks have been made. This one baffles me. If a knitter can make a sock, he or she is basically good to go to make anything else I can think of. Just because it is small, doesn’t mean it doesn’t require skill and technique to make a good sock. To me, socks are like cookies. Some cookies require more baking skills and technique than a full course meal. Learning to work with double pointed needles or the magic loop is a lot to learn and master. Socks can be a truly gratifying project to make. In my mind, nothing beats a pair of handmade socks for a gift. They are little works of art. And, if the person receiving them has a brain in their head, they have to appreciate the work, skill, and sincerity that was put into them. I am working on a future blog just about socks. There is a lot more to say about them. I am also almost finished designing a bag for the sock maker—the Sox Box. It is another version of the cone bag designed for Habu cones. Below you will find two different versions of the cone bag.

Continue Reading Step Out Of The Box!

Why You Should Start Your Projects For Winter Right Now (Yes, Right Now)

While it has started to become just a tad warm out there, and you probably don’t feel like knitting with wool, hear me out.  You normally don’t start your sweaters, coats, and blankets until it starts to get a bit cooler, right?  Well, those are pretty big projects.  They take a lot of time, especially if you like working with small gauge. My thinking is, why not start those puppies now so you have them by the time it cools down again? How awesome would it be when October rolled around, and you had a toasty cardigan made of, say, baby alpaca, merino wool, or cashmere all blocked and ready to go? Pretty darn awesome, that’s how much. Continue Reading Why You Should Start Your Projects For Winter Right Now (Yes, Right Now)

Scarfaholic – The Summer Scarf – Part One

I am not a warm weather person and losing the ability to wear my winter clothing makes it even harder to endure, because I love sweaters, boots, layered clothing, and, of course, scarves.  When traveling to Europe, everyone (especially in France) continues to wear scarves in the warmer weather.  I decided to adopt this trend, so I have knitted and purchased a ton of summer scarves over the years. I will share some of my findings and thoughts over two separate blog posts.

Online Knitting SuppliesDon’t be quick to discount the summer scarf.  Like its winter counterpart, it finishes off and “ties together” an outfit.  I really like the way a tank top looks with a light summer scarf.  Obviously, the materials one would choose to make a summer scarf will differ greatly from the thick and soft luxury fibers chosen to make a winter scarf.  This doesn’t mean you have to sacrifice all luxury fibers in making a lighter weight scarf, just that you will have to choose fibers smarter.

I am currently working on a few summer scarves, hoping to have them finished and ready to wear in the next month.  One is made of Shibui Linen, and is a free pattern on their website.  It is designed by Antonia Shankland, who always seems to design scarves that I would choose to make.  They are easy and gorgeous.  I am making this particular scarf with the colors brick, apple, sidewalk, and tar in the Shibui Linen.  All these colors can be ordered on our website.

Online Knitting SuppliesI am also working on a scarf using Habu linen.  So far, I am still experimenting with this pattern, trying to combine two yarns throughout the scarf and haven’t been happy with the results.  I will put this finished scarf in a future blog when I get it right.  Having said that, I am more than happy with the Habu Linen itself.  Here is what I have knitted so far.  This just might be an all linen scarf.  You cannot tell from the picture how light and beautiful this linen feels knitted up. Continue Reading Scarfaholic – The Summer Scarf – Part One

Knitting to Know Ewe Pattern Featured by Shibui Knits

Strata Shibui Knits

Diane Greenfield shares her Strata scarf with Shibui Knits at TNNA.

Shibui Knits is now featuring a scarf designed by Diane Greenfield, owner of Knitting to Know Ewe. Shibui has chosen the Strata scarf to highlight their yarns. Knitters across the country are now working on the Strata scarf!

The Strata is a “knitted piece about process.” This scarf uses a combination of Shibui Silk Cloud, Cima, and Pebble yarns and is a great pattern for knitters looking to combine different textures and colors. Yarns are held double or triple throughout the progression of this gently textured scarf—a background of twisted stockinette makes this knit meticulous, but not difficult. The final result is a lightweight scarf that celebrates color. When finished, the scarf is 92 inches long and 14.5 inches wide.

Shibui is offering the pattern for free with the purchase of yarn. Get started on your own Strata scarf today! Stop in to Knitting to Know Ewe to pick up some Shibui yarn and the Strata pattern.

The Scarfoholic Series Continues: The Garter Sideways Scarf

For those of you who love knitting scarves as much as I do, I had to do a blog on one of my favorite scarves to knit. A knitter told me once that a scarf knitted in garter stitch, done sideways, lays better than any other scarf. (Thank you, Cassandra). So, I set about making this scarf to see if she was right. I like my scarves to be from 80” to 90” long, and about 9” to 10” wide. For the first scarf I tested, I used one of my favorite luxury yarns. Road to China Light, by Fibre Company is a gorgeous yarn to do just about anything with. I knew it would not only look beautiful done in garter stitch, but would feel luxurious as well. My gauge was right on at 5 stitches to the inch on a size 6 needle. So, I knew that if I wanted the scarf to be 90” long, I needed to cast on 450 stitches. I used Addi Lace Clicks, creating a cable of 60 inches to accommodate the stitches I needed to cast on. I would like to note here that, if you are like I am and fall in love with making sideways scarves, you might consider purchasing the Addi-Clicks. You can create unlimited combinations for projects using the different cables and needles. Since needles are not inexpensive, it is actually a practical investment purchasing the set of needles rather than one at a time in different gauges. If you wish to take a look at the sets of Addi Clicks offered, here is the link.

I used five colors of the Road to China Light. I needed one skein of each color for the scarf. Each skein made a stripe when completely used up. The colors I used were: Peridot, Riverstone, Citrine, Camelian, and Ruby. (All of the above materials can be found and purchased on this website. Here is the link.)For the last color, I only used half the skein to make the stripe thinner, so that it acted as an accent edge to make the scarf look more finished and added something interesting. Here is the result:

Knitting Yarn - Knitting to Know Ewe

I was very pleased with the scarf. It did, indeed, lay beautifully.

Continue Reading The Scarfoholic Series Continues: The Garter Sideways Scarf

A Confessed Scarfoholic

scarfSince learning how to knit at the age of ten, it is unnecessary to say that I have accumulated somewhat of a hillock of knitting projects. There have been tons of sweaters knitted just for the store alone. And, don’t get me wrong. I do enjoy putting on that finished sweater and prancing around the house, singing “I made this! I am a genius!” (Let’s face it. There is nothing like self praise). I have gone the gamut from socks, baby sweaters, afghans, and gloves. I have nurtured a healthy addiction to all aspects of felting, from dry needle to knitted felting. But, far and above everything else, I LOVE making scarves. Why, you may ask? Okay. I will tell you.

There are limitless types of scarves. It is an ideal first project. It can be a very basic design, but made out of a luxury fiber, it can be spectacular. When I am teaching someone to knit, we start with a simple scarf. But, it is my belief that using a quality yarn and great needles makes knitting easier to learn, and ends with a much nicer scarf. Continue Reading A Confessed Scarfoholic